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An astronomical 85% of people are unhappy with their software engineering jobs, according to a global poll of the world’s one billion full-time workers.

Millions of American workers have left their jobs within the past year amid the Great Resignation, an economic trend wherein workers quit their jobs at historic rates during the COVID-19 pandemic.

So, how do you know when it’s time to start looking for a new software engineering job?

If you’re considering leaving, take a look at these five subtle signs it might be time to pack up your desk and head out the door.


1. You feel like you’ve plateaued at work

It’s difficult to stay motivated and productive at work if you feel there’s no space for advancement.

Feeling like you’ve reached a stalemate might take many forms for different people. For example, it might imply a lack of promotions and wage hikes, uninspiring tasks, or a lack of opportunities to master new skills.

You likely also feel under-challenged.

If you can do the software engineering job easily with your eyes shut, then it’s time to think about moving on to a new software engineering job that’s less predictable. While many people would laud at the idea of having mastered their workday, not feeling challenged in some way can lead to boredom and devoidness of workplace engagement.

Long-term unfulfilled promises from your supervisor, such as a new position or further training can be taxing as well.


2. You’re easily irritated with your boss or colleagues

Do you find yourself unreasonably annoyed by your boss or co-workers? Have their gaffs become more aggravating than zany lately?

If yes, that may be a sign you’re feeling frustrated and bored.

This is referred to as displacement in psychology, and it is a defense strategy in which a person transfers an unpleasant feeling from its original source to a less threatening recipient.

When this happens regularly, your relationships with your coworkers will begin to deteriorate quickly, exacerbating the initial problem.

We all have terrible days, but if this is something you’re experiencing on a regular basis, it’s probably time to start looking for a new software engineering job that will bring you more enjoyment.


3. You complain about work often

Notice if you’ve been doing frequent eye rolls, heavy sighs, and grumblings beneath your breath at work

If you find yourself being unsatisfied with different aspects of your job, dreading going to work, sitting down at your computer, and thinking ‘ugh I can’t believe I have to do this’- that’s a clue that you may need to look at what else is out there.

While it isn’t expected to be happy at work all the time, displaying defensive behaviors and offering snippy transactional-type responses, and providing minimal information are other red flags.

Changes in your attitude and approach to work might be an indication that it’s time to reconsider your options.


4. You feel a cultural disconnection

Company culture plays a key role in your productivity, engagement, and happiness. Any disconnection might cause problems.

For example, if you value work-life balance and are constantly bombarded with emails from your employer at all hours of the day, this might lead to burnout.

Ask yourself this question: Are you proud of your company? Are you truly happy?

It may be time to move on if you find yourself constantly disparaging your employer or no longer share the same values as others in your workplace.


5. You simply don’t care anymore

You used to be excited and made an effort to bring your A-game to work. But nowadays, you’ve begun to feel like all you do is show up, go through the motions, and then go home.

Overachieving or coming up with fresh ideas no longer appeals to you, and you’re only there to collect your paycheck. And the laziness, apathy, and dissidence have negatively affected the quality of your work, and your manager has noticed.

These are all signs that you are significantly disengaged at work.

There may be several factors contributing to your indifference. It might be because your current employer isn’t investing in your professional growth, isn’t providing you with enough challenges, or simply doesn’t value your responsibilities.

No matter the reason, when you’ve stopped caring about your career, it’s time to look for greener pastures.


Overcoming The Psychological Barriers Stopping You

Quitting can be emotionally challenging. There are several psychological barriers that might prevent someone from quitting his or her job, many of which are similar to the reasons why many individuals stay in unsatisfactory relationships.

For example, many of us are plagued by negative or unhelpful voices in our thoughts that tell us we’ll fail if we attempt anything new, or that we don’t deserve new opportunities. Stress and boredom may sometimes cause us to be caught in inertia – we know we need to change but lack the mental energy and ambition to do so.

It’s also easy to succumb to the sunk cost fallacy; you’ve invested so much time in your present employment, and even if you’re unhappy, wouldn’t it be a waste to leave now?

So how can you break past the mental hurdles that are keeping you from progressing?


1. Slowly ease into it.

Set aside thirty minutes each day to begin seeking new software engineering jobs.

Don’t start applying just yet; instead, think about what you really want in a new software engineering job and develop a precise list.

It’s critical that your next employment move be carefully considered rather than impulsively decided out of desperation and discontent.

By devoting thirty minutes every day to planning your next step, you’ll begin to feel more in charge without feeling overwhelmed.


2. Make self-improvement a priority

Get a new hobby, take a language class, do stand-up comedy– it doesn’t really matter.

Career coaches agree that having a passion outside of your professional life is one of the keys to career success since it can help you think creatively and better manage work-life balance.

Exercise has also been shown to be particularly useful in terms of lowering stress and improving concentration. This will also provide you with a sense of accomplishment and pride, both of which will benefit your long-term mental health.


3. Improve your self-confidence

Put an end to that negative internal narrative by focusing on all of the things you accomplish well.

Reflect on good comments you’ve received at work, ask your friends and family what they appreciate best about you, and recall moments when you outperformed your expectations.

When you realize how much you have to give, finding your next job will be a lot easier, and you won’t be willing to put up with boredom and aggravation at work.


4. Work with a software engineering recruiter

Job seekers try to tackle the process of finding a new career on their own and wind up completely overwhelmed, or they hear nothing and feel demoralized before giving up.

As a result, it is advantageous to work with a reliable software engineering recruitment partner.

Not only will it save you the time and effort of filling out lengthy and time-consuming job applications, but your recruitment consultant will also provide you with helpful and honest advice to ensure you make the right decision, as well as access to exclusive positions that aren’t advertised elsewhere.


Last note… 

Here at Jarvis Elliott, we pride ourselves in being the global leaders in SaaS recruitment. We partner exclusively with some of the biggest SaaS brands in the world, meaning we offer the best SaaS opportunities within the marketplace; ranging from rapidly growing SMEs to huge global brands.

Sign up today and let us help you find your dream SaaS job.

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